TED’s presented our share of near-misses and might-never-happen tech demos — including, depending on how you count, at least 5 flying cars.

“'Nothing replaces the loss of a son, not even another son.’

Safia Abo Zour, 25, holds her five-month-old baby, Mohammed, with one hand and holds with the other the sweater her older son, also named Mohammed, wore the last time he went to kindergarten. Mohammed had just turned four years old when he was killed during the second war in Gaza in 2011 after an airstrike on his family's house in the Al Zaitoun neigborhood. Safia named her new baby after his brother." -- Eman Mohammed

Portraits by photojournalist Eman Mohammed.

English-born photographer Robert Leslie drove a total of 10,000 miles across the American South and Southwest. What he found was not a prosperous land of opportunity but a storm-torn region in decay.

Photographer Adam Magyar shoots the world at high speed and then slows it down to 56 times the length of reality.

For this eerie organism, Huang recorded eye movements up-close, and nestled a screen to show the footage among inflated plastic bags and other household materials. "The idea of taking existing objects, merging them and making something new and magical is wonderful to me," he says. EX-C-F 4 (YK-Eye), by Shih Chieh Huang, 2009. Photo courtesy of the artist.

Artist Shih Chieh Huang takes everyday objects—garbage bags, plastic bottles, food containers, old computer parts—and transforms them into surreal sea creatures. See his work, up close and personal.

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Doug Menuez began photographing Steve Jobs in 1985, and then he spent 15 years immersed in the booming world of Silicon Valley innovation. Take a step back in time to see young titans in action.

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Photographer Camille Seaman began chasing storms in 2008. Little did she know that she was joining a select club, with its own habits and language. Here, she shares some of the lingo you might need to get by in this world — and some of her latest images.