Photo: Iwan Baan.

Can architecture actually make a difference in the lives of the people who use it? Michael Murphy and his team at MASS Design Group believe so. Take a look at their designs.

Jorge Otero-Pailos, “The Ethics of Dust: Old US Mint, San Francisco” (2016). Yerba Buena Center for the Arts. (Photo courtesy of Jorge Otero-Pailos). The installation is made of conservation latex that has been used to ‘clean’ the chimneys of the Old US Mint, where the gold from the California gold rush was turned into coins. As one of the only buildings surviving the 1906 earthquake, the pollution from the US Mint is some of the oldest pollution in San Francisco.

Pollution is a blight, right? Not so fast, says architect Jorge Otero-Pailos, whose projects invite us to consider the important history lessons provided by layer upon layer of dirt.

Photo: Susanne Pertl.

Architect Diébédo Francis Kéré designs with both people and sustainability in mind. Raised in Burkina Faso, though he’s now based in Berlin, his buildings have community at their heart.

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Architecture expos are often futurist fantasias of design — but this year’s Venice Architecture Biennale imagines how humanity’s first art can house (and treat) us all better.

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What happens when a city is managed almost completely by private corporations? Visit Gurgaon, India, a boomtown of millions without a citywide system for water, electricity or even public sewers.

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In 2012, the Moroccan Ministry of Culture asked architect Aziza Chaouni to rehabilitate the ancient al-Qarawiyyin Library in Fez. She describes the challenges inherent in undertaking a daunting, historic project.

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Architect Ole Scheeren is fed up with the rigid, hierarchy of the skyscraper. He hopes his buildings will change the way we think about soaring towers.