TED Prize winner Sarah Parcak has learned some key lessons about parenthood from her work as an archaeologist. At the same time, becoming a parent has given her new insights into what her work means.

Jorge Otero-Pailos, “The Ethics of Dust: Old US Mint, San Francisco” (2016). Yerba Buena Center for the Arts. (Photo courtesy of Jorge Otero-Pailos). The installation is made of conservation latex that has been used to ‘clean’ the chimneys of the Old US Mint, where the gold from the California gold rush was turned into coins. As one of the only buildings surviving the 1906 earthquake, the pollution from the US Mint is some of the oldest pollution in San Francisco.

Pollution is a blight, right? Not so fast, says architect Jorge Otero-Pailos, whose projects invite us to consider the important history lessons provided by layer upon layer of dirt.


Iranian-American Muslim comedian Negin Farsad describes what happens when Islam meets Rumi meets apple pie.


As a radio host, Celeste Headlee has engaged in more than her fair share of discussions, and she has thought a lot about ways to bring out the best in a conversational counterpart. One thing she likes to say — a good conversation is like a game of catch. Huh? She explains.


Ancient Peru was home to many cultures, most of them still mysterious. But as Sarah Parcak points her satellite-archaeology lens (and her new citizen-explorer project) at the Peruvian wilderness, the invisible past is primed to make a remarkable comeback.


In 2012, the Moroccan Ministry of Culture asked architect Aziza Chaouni to rehabilitate the ancient al-Qarawiyyin Library in Fez. She describes the challenges inherent in undertaking a daunting, historic project.

Andrew Nemr | Photo by Bret Hartman for TED

Here’s how the dancer, teacher and dance historian Andrew Nemr is trying to make tap dance relevant again.