Around the world, right now, several countries are developing autonomous weapons that use artificial intelligence to locate, track and destroy their targets. AI researcher Toby Walsh explains why that’s a problem.

Autonomous flying machines meet the entertainment industry. Whimsy and delight ensue.

Roboticist Raffaello D’Andrea describes his work on three new autonomous flying machines, including one that “knows” what to do when it loses a propeller. (Hint: it doesn’t crash.)


Fotokite is a drone-on-a-string. The unmanned aerial vehicle can be guided simply by the tug of a string. Inventor Sergei Lupashin explains how it works.

Andreas Raptopoulos of Matternet is attempting to create a network of drones that operate like the Internet, only for tangible objects.

Marc Goodman
 of the Future Crimes Institute and Singularity University shares his thinking on the promise — and threat — of drones.

regina dugan

Watch how drones have been presented on the TED stage in various ways over 15 years.