William Gibson in 2012. Photo: Gilly Youner

We called Gibson at home in Vancouver to chat about the looming apocalypse, what he was like as a student, and what advice he would give a young science-fiction writer today.

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As director of the MIT Media Lab, Joi Ito is constantly thinking about what the future might hold. But, he says, an obsession with what’s to come is unhealthy and unhelpful. He shares 8 pieces of advice to help us embrace complexity and thrive right now.

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Predictions are a mug’s game. If they come true, you likely didn’t push your thinking hard enough. If they don’t come true, you risk looking like an idiot. Nonetheless, we asked attendees and speakers at this year’s TED conference to share what they think might radically change society, life, technology and so on in the next 30 years.

From machine intelligence to post-subsistence economies, Google’s Blaise Ag├╝era y Arcas lays out 6 (okay, 7) ways everything is set to change.

From the climate crisis to rising inequality to the debate about transparency and privacy, vote in our online poll to determine which will be the biggest driver of change in the next 30 years.

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The technology advances of the last 30 years were great. But they’re just the start. What’s most exciting is still to come, says author Nilofer Merchant.

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What will it mean when almost anyone can read and understand the world and everything on it, in it, and above it — in real time, at will? Andrew Blau investigates.