But some jobs — and industries — will still require a human touch. Technology researchers Andrew McAfee and Erik Brynjolfsson have a guess as to which ones.

This year has been marked by upheaval on a global scale — and many of us are wondering: What will happen next? Satellite archaeologist and TED Prize winner Sarah Parcak shares three examples from the ancient past that offer lessons for today.

Neuroscientist and philosopher Sam Harris describes a scenario that is both terrifying and likely to occur. It’s not, he says, a good combination.

In his instantly recognizable, grandly sweeping style, eL Seed has painted Arabic calligraffiti murals everywhere from Tunisia to Paris, Dubai to New York. Recently, he created his most ambitious project yet: a mural that spans 50 buildings — and can only be fully seen from a nearby mountain. eL Seed pursued this self-funded project as a way to make a political point, but he describes, the real transformation was personal.

“We still live in a world where the color of our skin not only gives a first impression, but a lasting one that remains,” says Brazilian artist Angélica Dass. She shows portraits from Humanae, the photo project she started to highlight the truly multi-colored hues of humankind.

History professor Yuval Noah Harari, author of “Sapiens: A Brief History of Mankind,” explains why humans have dominated Earth. The reason’s not what you might expect.

David Oyelowo in Selma. Photo courtesy of Paramount Pictures. | ideas.ted.com

In the movie Selma, director Ava DuVernay chronicles the 1965 marches that led to the passage of the Voting Rights Act. She explained why Martin Luther King Jr. is so much more than a symbol or an annual holiday.