What’s it like to have a song inside your head, itching to get out? A neuroscientist and a songwriter compare notes from the frontier of music and science.


The British neuroscientist Adrian Owen has developed a way to connect with patients in a vegetative state. It’s amazing work with complicated implications.

How to be good at stress | ideas.ted.com

What does it mean to be “good” at stress? Does it mean that you don’t get stressed out? That you stay calm under pressure and bounce back from adversity? Not exactly. Stress researcher Kelly McGonigal shares her surprising findings.

The science of laughter | ideas.ted.com

British cognitive neuroscientist Sophie Scott studies vocal communication. She explains why looking into giggles and mirth is important … and shares ways she makes subjects laugh in the lab.


Neuroscientist David Eagleman explains his latest invention, the “versatile extra-sensory transducer,” a vest installed with tiny motors that can convert sound and noise into vibrations on the back, allowing deaf people to hear the world through vibrations.

Prisoner's Arms Resting on Cell Bars

In 1991, Shaka Senghor shot and killed a man, and spent 19 years in prison for his crime. He talks with neuroscientist Daniel Reisel about the challenge of rehabilitating in prison — and why it’s so important to restore people to society.


Ok, not exactly. But the possibility has been floated by some scientists investigating neurogenesis, the idea that new neurons are generated in the human brain throughout life. Daniel Reisel explores the impact this new understanding might have on things like our criminal justice system in a new book, “Rewiring Our Reality.”