Rich Benjamin

African American writer Rich Benjamin spent two years living in — and writing about — America’s whitest neighborhoods. The response to his book (and TED Talk) was honest, raw — and sometimes misunderstood his purpose. Here, he responds to the response.

Dustin Yellin ocean lady creature

When Dustin Yellin was eight years old, he buried a dollar bill, a pen and a fork inside a box, with the specific idea that aliens might find it in the future. It’s unclear what would happen then or, indeed, what happened to the box, but it did start Yellin on an artistic journey of discovery, one in which he still merrily makes boxes. Take a spin through the work (and mind) of a singular artist.

PhysicalTherapy_Ideas

As anyone who’s ever recovered from an injury knows, physical therapy can be painful, boring and slow. Romanian entrepreneur and TED Fellow Cosmin Mihaiu is out to change that with MIRA, software that disguises physical therapy exercises as fun-to-play videogames. Here’s how it works.

Gayle Tzemach Lemmon women embrace the and

Journalist Gayle Tzemach Lemmon spent two years working on a story about the creation of an all-women special ops team within the US military. She shares how it prompted a surprising revelation.

_2015_03_01_Solar_Impulse_2_RTW_Second_Test_Flight_AbuDhabi_Stefatou_-10

Here’s a riddle for you: A plane flew for five days and nights, staying airborne for 118 hours. But it didn’t use a single drop of fuel. How? Bertrand Piccard explains.

PamelaRonald

Genetic engineering and organic farming are often set up in opposition to one another. After all, how could one agricultural practice that eschews any influence other than Nature coexist with another that is entirely cultivated in a lab? Well, in the household of Pamela Ronald and Raoul Adamchak, they live together up close and personally, as the genetic scientist and organic farmer are married. Here, the pair discuss the complexity of modern agriculture.

Jonathan Home quantum computing

Computers have become so powerful that the idea they can’t just do, you know, *everything* is almost unfathomable. Yet many calculations are still too big for even the biggest supercomputer to process. That’s where the promise of quantum computing comes in. Scientist and TED Fellow Jonathan Home explains.