A new technology aspires to harness the powerful human sense of smell to enhance our daily lives. Someday this approach might even be used to benefit our health. How is this possible? Step one: Just inhale.

Babies start laughing before they can speak, and this delicious sound just may serve as a powerful source of human communication and connection, says psychology researcher Caspar Addyman.

Researchers have identified many things — such as unpredictable laughter and unkempt hair — that we find unsettling in others. But they’ve also realized this: We humans are pretty poor judges of who we should trust, says psychologist Julia Shaw.

How do color-blind cephalopods — octopus, squid and others — achieve such a good color match when they camouflage? (in short: amazing, distributed brains). And what does it take to study these elusive animals in the wild? (a whole lot of patience). Marine scientist Roger Hanlon dives deeper into his research.

Don’t be misled by the cringing creatures seen in The Lion King. From their biology to their social structure, spotted hyenas are complex creatures like none other on earth, explains author and conservationist Lucy Cooke.

Thoughts like these are completely normal, but many new moms feel ashamed of having them. Here’s how to let go of self-judgment and too-high expectations, from reproductive psychiatrists Alexandra Sacks and Catherine Birndorf.

It sounds paradoxical, but accepting our negative emotions will actually make us happier in the long run. Psychologist Susan David explains how.