From wrapping paper and greeting cards to party favors and ornaments, millions of everyday items sparkle due to glitter. And while these shimmering objects are festive and eye-catching, they’re harming our planet and contributing to climate change. Environmental science researcher Claire Gwinnett PhD explains how.

“I look absolutely fine, but I wake up every day in pain,” says social epidemiologist Margot Gage Witvliet PhD. Here, she shares what life with long COVID has been like — and how it can happen to anyone.

You’ve probably seen a lot of climate change jargon in the news lately — words like “mitigation”, “carbon neutral” and “sustainable development”. To free you from confusion, here’s a helpful explainer from science communicators and researchers.

An accidental discovery led neuroscientist Rebecca Brachman PhD towards new insights into how stress triggers depression and PTSD — and could offer a new approach to help fortify our resilience against mental illness.

Hundreds of companies have set ambitious targets to reach net-zero carbon emissions by 2050. But what does i take to get there? And, more importantly, will it be enough to slow climate change? Environmental economics experts Oliver Miltenberger and Matthew D. Potts explain the challenges and opportunities.

It’s not just your imagination … the world is actually getting wetter. That’s because as temperatures rise, the atmosphere can hold — and release — more water. A look at the science behind heavy rains and how you can safeguard yourself from floods.

Turns out, your memory isn’t a like video camera, recording a constant stream of every sight and sound you’re exposed to. In fact, you can only capture and retain what you pay attention to. Author and neuroscientist Lisa Genova explains.