Most of us blame our phones as the reason we can’t get anything done. But the real culprit often isn’t those shiny devices, which means we can stay focused simply by switching our perspective, says technology expert Nir Eyal.

Not us [shifty eyes]. But just in case a friend was asking, mortician Caitlin Doughty is here to share insider knowledge and eyebrow-raising trivia, and, yes answer that question.

Being a writer is all about expressing your unique perspective with feeling and originality, not about having a huge vocabulary or getting published, says author Jacqueline Woodson. She shares a little of what she’s learned in the process of writing a lot (30+ books!). 

Most of us want to believe we would have flagged Hitler and Madoff right away had we met them in person. But would we have? In a thought-provoking new book, writer Malcolm Gladwell argues that our inborn tendencies and biases skew our judgement and prevent us from spotting the evil among us.

Politicians and other public figures deploy particular rhetorical devices to communicate their ideas and to convince people, and it’s time that we all learned how to use them, says speechwriter Simon Lancaster.

When we’re overwhelmed by emotions, we’re usually not our best selves. We may blow up, say hurtful things or burst into tears. But what if we had a tool we could use to turn down the temperature at those times? Psychologist Marc Brackett has a helpful strategy.

Regular super-short meetings can yield major results — they serve to bond teams, keep projects on track, avert misunderstandings and more, says organizational psychologist Steven Rogelberg.