Yes, plastic straws are bad, but they’re just a teeny drop in the giant ocean of plastic we’re swimming in. Here are other everyday plastic objects that we could put on the discontinued list.

A flying device combined with some nifty software is serving up invaluable information about the health of whales — and our oceans.

You can — at a visionary social enterprise called Plastic Bank, which is not only improving people’s lives but keeping junk from going into the ocean.

Bren Smith wants to create thousands of decent jobs, transform how we harvest food from the oceans, and blunt the effects of climate change and marine degradation — all at the same time. His big idea: small-scale marine farms.

Bigeye at Rapture Reef, a part of the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands Marine National Monument. Within this marine protected area, fish species can rebound. Photo by the NOAA National Ocean Service.

Given climate change, coral bleaching, ocean acidification and overfishing, it can be easy to feel depressed about our oceans. But when you look at the big picture of ocean health, good news emerges.

Thomas Peschak takes stunning, up-close pictures of starfish, sharks and whales. His goal? To make us fall in love with them so much that we might even care about preserving the oceans.

Jason deCaires Taylor casts giant cement sculptures that weigh thousands of pounds — and then sinks them into the ocean. His idea: to create a unique underwater gallery that algae, corals and other sea creatures can call home.