Marriage researcher Carol Bruess shares advice for how couples can strive to cultivate connection during this unprecedented global pandemic.

“Resentment is a relationship killer,” says psychotherapist and couples counselor Susan Adler. If we want happier relationships, we need to drop the blame, own our mistakes, and act in ways that increase connection, not conflict.

Most relationships in which loneliness has taken up residence can be shifted to a better daily reality, says marriage researcher Carol Bruess. All it takes some patience and effort.

Relationships take work, but there’s good news: Researchers, writers and podcasters have already done some of the heavy lifting in exploring how we can connect with the people in our lives. Marriage and family researcher Carol Bruess shares a list of her favorite relationship books and podcasts.

In this preview of the “Dear Guy” advice column, psychologist Guy Winch addresses a reader who is facing a small Thanksgiving.

It’s never too late — or too early — to learn the abilities that make up romantic competence: insight, mutuality and emotional regulation. And when you possess these skills, all of the relationships in your life will benefit, says psychologist and researcher Joanne Davila.

Many young people are turning to pornography for information. With this reality comes an opportunity: We can utilize it to start important conversations with them about sex and relationships, says public health researcher Emily Rothman.