Many of us still rely on coping strategies that were formed when we were young. Could yours use an update? Neuroscientist Wendy Suzuki PhD explains why you need to check and how to change them for the better.

Coauthors (and twin sisters) Emily and Amelia Nagoski share straightforward advice on how you can handle your stress *before* it turns into burnout.

Feeling nervous about socializing again? Us too. So does organizational psychologist Tasha Eurich PhD — and here’s what she did to quickly squash her stress.

Like many of us, journalist Celeste Headlee felt like she was just. too. busy. What finally made the difference was increasing her time perception — tracking what she did in her waking hours — and making changes to get the life she really wanted.

Here’s how you can take control of your brain’s knee-jerk reactions to distressing situations, says psychology researcher Lisa Penney.

How to be good at stress | ideas.ted.com

What does it mean to be “good” at stress? Does it mean that you don’t get stressed out? That you stay calm under pressure and bounce back from adversity? Not exactly. Stress researcher Kelly McGonigal shares her surprising findings.

For many of us, just hearing the word “stress” can shorten our breathing and raise our heart rate — but as psychologist Kelly McGonigal seeks to show, stress does not always have to be a negative.