Social psychologist Heidi Grant shares 4 common ways that we inadvertently make things weird for other people when we request their assistance. Read this before your next ask.

Regular super-short meetings can yield major results — they serve to bond teams, keep projects on track, avert misunderstandings and more, says organizational psychologist Steven Rogelberg.

Humanity is in short supply at many workplaces, where it’s been pushed out by automation and a culture of overwork. Social psychologist Adam Waytz writes about a surprising way to restore humanity and also improve employee engagement: Giving people the time and encouragement to unplug completely from their jobs.

In this overscheduled, overstimulating world, it’s no surprise that many of us feel like introverts at some point during our days. In an excerpt from The TED Interview podcast, writer Susan Cain talks about how workplaces can better support people’s quieter side and what helped her conquer her fear of public speaking.

Steven Rogelberg, who studies meetings, shares 6 simple ways they can be improved. The next time you’re in a useless one, print this out afterwards and leave it on the chair of the person who led it.

Instead of having an answer to every question, the most effective leaders are coaches — people who can guide others to arrive at their own solutions, put them into action, and set goals, says researcher and management consultant Julia Milner.

Many of us have an inner voice telling us we lucked into what we have or we’re a fraud. That’s normal; the problem is when we believe it. Here’s how to start recognizing your own worth, from coach and consultant Tania Katan.