A growing body of research suggests that swimming provides a unique boost to our brain health. Neurobiologist Seena Mathew explains what scientists know — and what they’re still figuring out.

Touch is — or was — one of the fundamental ways that we relate to one another. Researcher Helena Wasling and psychologist Guy Winch explain what we can do to ease the difficulty of being without this physical connection.

By more clearly identifying our feelings or by recategorizing them, we can reduce suffering (yes!) and increase well-being, says neuroscientist Lisa Feldman Barrett.

It’s because infants understand what other humans are drawn to, and they copy their behavior and learn from it. Even as adults, our actions continue to be driven — often unconsciously — by others.

By examining the eight-armed marine creature and the peculiar way it engages with the world, we can get a glimpse into different ways of existing and being, says cognitive neuroscientist Anil Seth.

Neuroscientist Robert Sapolsky shows us the surprising ways that our brains get mixed up between the physical and metaphorical — and how this can pit us against each other.

Neuroscientist Uri Hasson takes us inside his lab’s fascinating research — and our heads — to show the meeting of the minds that occurs every time we talk to each other.