Tough times are inevitable. Wellbeing and resilience expert Lucy Hone shares the three straightforward tactics that she used to get through her darkest days.

Most of us live with a constant stream of internal statements, criticisms and commands running through our heads. But we have a choice: We don’t have to let them define us — or our days, says psychology researcher Steven Hayes. Here’s how we can disentangle ourselves.

When we’re overwhelmed by emotions, we’re usually not our best selves. We may blow up, say hurtful things or burst into tears. But what if we had a tool we could use to turn down the temperature at those times? Psychologist Marc Brackett has a helpful strategy.

It sounds paradoxical, but accepting our negative emotions will actually make us happier in the long run. Psychologist Susan David explains how.

Here are three common-sense tips to help you feed your hunger, not your emotions, from dietician Eve Lahijani.

Most of us know have been in its grip before — the alarm goes off, our mind starts whirring away, and before you know it, we’ve done a freefall into worry. Neuroscientist Lisa Feldman Barrett has been there, too, and she tells us how we can stop the spiral.

If you’ve ever experienced pleasure from people’s failures, well, join the rest of us. Here’s how to manage and make the most of your schadenfreude, says cultural historian Tiffany Watt Smith.