The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the ability of world leaders to respond to enormous challenges. Some women have notably risen to the occasion, and Avivah Wittenberg-Cox, an expert in gender, business and leadership, shares 6 takeaways.

Leadership requires you to be present to the needs, abilities, and potential of other people. But when it’s always all about you, that’s virtually impossible to do. Here are 10 warning signs that you may be getting in your own way — and what you can do if you are, from leadership experts Francis Frei and Anne Morriss.

The 4 habits are: Solving instead of delegating; discouraging bad news; avoiding complex issues; and not asking for feedback. Team performance expert Elizabeth Lyle explains what they are, and how you can fix them.

If we want to improve the competence level of people in leadership positions, we need to improve our own competence for judging and selecting them, especially when they are men, says organizational psychologist Tomas Chamorro-Premuzic.

Most people go into top positions with good intentions, but those often crumble due to the demands — and perks — of the job. If you want to succeed, devote some time and energy to self-leadership, says consultant Lars Sudmann.

Instead of having an answer to every question, the most effective leaders are coaches — people who can guide others to arrive at their own solutions, put them into action, and set goals, says researcher and management consultant Julia Milner.

Like it or not, charisma matters when it comes to leadership. But we should be aware of the power that persuasion can have on us, says business school professor and researcher Jochen Menges.