And it’s not just running — you can get these feelings of bliss and well-being from other kinds of physical activity too. Research psychologist Kelly McGonigal explains how we can get it and why it exists.

Adopting a brain-healthy diet is a powerful tool in maximizing cognitive health and helping prevent dementia and Alzheimer’s disease, says neuroscientist and nutritionist Lisa Mosconi. What’s more, it may even ward off common ailments that affect many women, from slow metabolism to insomnia and depression. Here are 8 steps to take.

Most of us feel scared about speaking in public, and in response, we either rehearse incessantly — or we stop doing it altogether. Neuroscientist Anwesha Banerjee has this suggestion: Why not get used to it?

The right kind of preparation can keep us from stumbling during stressful situations, says cognitive scientist Sian Leah Beilock.

Most of us know have been in its grip before — the alarm goes off, our mind starts whirring away, and before you know it, we’ve done a freefall into worry. Neuroscientist Lisa Feldman Barrett has been there, too, and she tells us how we can stop the spiral.

By more clearly identifying our feelings or by recategorizing them, we can reduce suffering (yes!) and increase well-being, says neuroscientist Lisa Feldman Barrett.

Our attention gets hijacked by everything from the stress in our lives to the ding of our phones. Neuroscientist Amishi Jha shows how we can cultivate the ability to focus on what really matters.