Turns out, your memory isn’t a like video camera, recording a constant stream of every sight and sound you’re exposed to. In fact, you can only capture and retain what you pay attention to. Author and neuroscientist Lisa Genova explains.

Many of us still rely on coping strategies that were formed when we were young. Could yours use an update? Neuroscientist Wendy Suzuki PhD explains why you need to check and how to change them for the better.

Roughly one in three people will experience panic attacks at some point during their lives. But there is good news: They usually pass in 10 – 15 minutes, and you can use a few techniques to manage them, say experts Cindy Aaronson PhD and Justin Feinstein PhD.

Touch is — or was — one of the fundamental ways that we relate to one another. Researcher Helena Wasling and psychologist Guy Winch explain what we can do to ease the difficulty of being without this physical connection.

Small space? No equipment? Can’t make noise? There are still a surprising number of ways to exercise at home — and the benefits you’ll gain are real and lasting, says neuroscientist Wendy Suzuki.

Most of us joke about hangovers, but the reality is no laughing matter: We’re suffering from alcohol withdrawal. Neuropsychopharmacologist David Nutt explains what scientists do know (and don’t) about these aches and pains — and what we can do to prevent and treat them.

It’s ironic but true: The best thing for your nervous system is another human and the worst thing for your nervous system is another human. Neuroscientist Lisa Feldman Barrett tells us why.