By more clearly identifying our feelings or by recategorizing them, we can reduce suffering (yes!) and increase well-being, says neuroscientist Lisa Feldman Barrett.

Our attention gets hijacked by everything from the stress in our lives to the ding of our phones. Neuroscientist Amishi Jha shows how we can cultivate the ability to focus on what really matters.

Some 2.5 percent of people are thought to be supertaskers — people who excel at multitasking. And we can use some of their strategies to boost our own skills, says psychiatrist Srini Pillay.

We should all feel empowered to take steps to keep our brains and bodies healthy, says neuroscientist and novelist Lisa Genova.

Psychologist Susan David explains why a simple switch from “I must go to the gym three times a week” to “I want to go to the gym three times a week” can put your goal within reach.

The brain in your head and the one in your gut are always exchanging info. But how do they do it? Neuroscientist Diego Bohórquez is trying to find out the answers.

It’s because infants understand what other humans are drawn to, and they copy their behavior and learn from it. Even as adults, our actions continue to be driven — often unconsciously — by others.