Losing these ceremonies and rites of passage may seem pretty small in the grand scheme of things, but it’s a big deal for our kids. Here’s how to help them grieve, from parenting expert Christine Carter.

Turns out, it’s less about “teaching” creativity to children — and more about creating a fertile environment in which their creativity will take root, grow and flourish. Researcher Mitch Resnick, director of the Lifelong Kindergarten Group at MIT, explains how we can do this.

When you give a child their first smartphone, don’t send them into the digital world unprepared. Here’s a look at the three-page agreement that technology executive Jennifer Zhu Scott asked her kids to sign when they got their phones, complete with some advice that adults should consider following, too.

One way to set up a child for success: Take some time every day to really see them for who they are, not for who you want them to be, says psychiatrist Daniel J. Siegel and social worker Tina Payne Bryson.

Got a car full of restless kids and miles of road ahead of you? These 8 TED-Ed lessons will entertain and amaze them — and teach them a thing or two along the way.

If kids don’t feel trusted — or if there isn’t anyone close to them whom they can rely on — they can really suffer. Esther Wojcicki, an educator and mother of three superstar daughters, explains why trust is essential and build it in the young people in our lives.

You don’t need to go to a national park to help your kids fall in love with nature; a walk around the block can be enough. Tech also doesn’t have to be the enemy. Instead, use it as a tool to enhance their awe, says science communicator Scott Sampson.