But there’s good news: the internet can help us dissolve these feelings and create new bonds of solidarity, says media theorist Douglas Rushkoff.

Like many parents, technology researcher Jordan Shapiro knew little about video games — and what he knew, he didn’t like. But that’s what his kids wanted to play. Through exploration and experimentation, he found they can be used to teach valuable lessons and build togetherness.

Digital minimalist Cal Newport shows how you can turn off the information firehose and follow current events on your own terms. Are you ready to join the attention resistance?

It is no exaggeration to say that the American election system is complicated. Just look at the recounts, and think about your own voting experiences. Here’s what’s needed to bring the US into the 21st century — and help bring every citizen to the polls.

Google, Facebook, Amazon and others make their profits in two main ways: by collecting as much data as possible from us and by controlling what we pay for, says online security expert Bruce Schneier. And what does this all depend on? A vulnerable internet.

Our electronic devices are often blamed — at times, rightfully so — for alienating us from our inner lives and from each other. But what if we could use them to cultivate self-compassion, not distraction? Technology expert Chris Dancy suggests how.

Turn it into a game, says technologist Esra’a Al Shafei. Thanks to features like a point system and a leaderboard, her small site for LGBTQ people in the Arab world is not only fun to use — it’s free from harassers.